East Coast Gardening

The biggest challenge when gardening on the East Coast is making sure your plant friends can withstand everything from humid summers, to hard freezes, to late frosts. This is not a climate where tropical plants, cacti, or succulents grow with abandon. Forget Pinterest pages that feature gardens that are “hands-off” or plants that “survive anything.” …

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East Coast Ecosystems

Different types of flora encourage healthy, diverse ecosystems that surround us. They are essential to the well-being of humans and other animals. Plants are smart —- they have evolved in their domains and environments for millions of years and are fantastic at what they do. However, not all plant species are created equal. Sometimes, either …

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Native Gardening on the East Coast

Using native plants for your garden is an ideal way to reduce maintenance and to be eco-friendly. Native plants, which grow wild in your climate, require minimal care, use few natural resources and provide food (and sometimes shelter) for pollinators. Some people may perceive that weeds can be cultivated and used in native plant gardening …

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Invasive Species of the East Coast

With the continuous changes in climatic conditions, all living organisms undergo adaptive processes to survive in their natural ecosystem. However, other organisms find it easy to migrate to a new ecosystem, which may favor their survival [1]. Invasive species can be termed organisms that cause both economic and ecological harm/effects in their new environment. As …

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Impact of the Tree-of-Heaven and Spotted Lanternfly

The tree-of-heaven, scientifically known as Ailanthus altissima, is a deciduous tree whose origin is northeast and central China and Taiwan (Jackson and Gover). The tree of heaven, sometimes going by the name ailanthus, is believed to get its way into the United States in Pennsylvania in 1784. Since then, it has spread increasingly in Pennsylvanian …

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Japanese Knotweed

Characteristics, Effects, and Controls The Japanese Knotweed invasive species, scientifically known as Fallopia japonica, is an Asian plant with a reputable ethnobotanical value among the Japanese. However, outside Asia, F. japonica is an invasive plant that ranks among the 100 worst invasive species as per IUCN. Bashtanova et al. describe the plant as a perennial …

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Impact of Invasive Plants in the Woodlands of the Eastern United States

The United States has since the 1960s worked hard and made significant progress in environmental protection. Before the 1990s, the state and the federal government have concentrated on weed control with pesticides. More importantly, better management methods were adopted after chemical methods were found to endanger human health and the environment [1]. After the 1990s …

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Invasive Trees of the Mid-Atlantic Region

Callery Pear (Pyrus calleryana) Introduced as an ornamental, the Callery pear is a medium-sized tree that used to enjoy widespread use as a rugged and attractive street tree. It flowers heavily, producing copious quantities of small fruit that birds enjoy eating. Birds can then carry the seeds far and wide, depositing them in the natural …

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Invasive Plants of the Mid-Atlantic Region

Chinese Lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) Lespedeza cuneata, unlike many of the plants on this list, is not a threat to forested areas. It prefers open spaces and full sun and thus invades fields, meadows, and endangered prairies. It can form dense stands and smother native plants. It is extremely difficult to control as well, as it …

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